Tag Archives: Obamacare

Your State Under Republican Rule

Hey, Gov. Bill Haslam: you might want to rethink that whole “we can’t afford the virtually free Medicaid expansion” deal the Feds are offering:

Crews were called to the Advance Auto Parts on Nolensville Pike after the robbery occurred around 8 p.m. Tuesday, according to a release from the Metro Nashville Police Department.

With a black mask concealing his face and a semiautomatic pistol in hand, he demanded money from a cash register. He allegedly repeatedly told the clerk “my girl’s got cancer, I need this money,” police said.

After the cashier complied, police said, the suspect fled on foot near the Full Gospel Mission Church.

I swear to God, Republicans have no clue how to run a government. On the other hand, I guess they’re wishing/hoping that cashier had been armed so he could “stand his ground” and shoot and kill the guy. Problem solved!

Republicans don’t care about people, plain and simple. They don’t care about black people, poor people, sick people, or anyone who’s either not a fetus or or a person of the “corporate” person.

Looks like it’s time for me to amend my “Top Signs Your Healthcare System Is Broken” list and add #6: when people rob you at gunpoint to pay for their girl’s cancer treatment.

I’m sick to death of Republicans driving people to desperation because they’ve never had to wonder where their next meal is coming from and assume everyone who does is just lazy. Fucking fuckers.

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Filed under healthcare, Nashville, Republican Party, Tennessee, Tennessee politics

“She Didn’t Ask”

Tennessee Gov. Haslam, who refuses to expand the state’s Medicaid program, preferring to let the state’s poor get sick and die (I suppose), while also claiming to have some kind of super-secret non-existent Tennessee plan that he’s supposedly “negotiating” (wink wink), and who recently was in the news asking HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius “to come up with a proposal that would give Tennessee more flexibility to expand Medicaid coverage,” could have asked Sebelius for an update on said plan today. Because today, Secretary Sebelius was in Nashville urging people to sign up for ObamaCare:

Sebelius was joined by Amy Speace, a 46-year-old singer-songwriter who was able to find insurance on the exchange for $30 a month with a $500 deductible, thanks to a tax credit. Speace said she did not at first think she would be eligible for insurance on the exchange because she already was covered by a high deductible plan through a musicians group. Despite that coverage, she nearly had to declare bankruptcy a few years ago when she developed laryngitis and ended up owing $5,000 in medical bills. She was only saved from bankruptcy by the help of a charity.

So, did Gov. Haslam meet with Sebelius for an update on that counterproposal? What do you think?

The governor told a reporter that he had no plans to meet with Sebelius when she came through Nashville on Thursday.

“She didn’t ask,” Haslam said.

I guess he just doesn’t give a shit.

Every day thousands of Tennesseans who lack health insurance face bankruptcy and worse. Gov. Haslam certainly doesn’t seem unduly concerned about those folks.

Good to know.

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Filed under Gov. Bill Haslam, health insurance, healthcare, Nashville, Obamacare

Best Healthcare In The World, V. Eleventybillion

Have you seen this video making the rounds?

When it comes to wait times for healthcare, I would just like to point out that not only is it correct that until Obamacare, millions of Americans died or sickened because they couldn’t get insurance and access the best healthcare system in the world, but also even ordinary, well-insured people such as myself have to deal with wait times. For example, today I called my doctor and was told her next appointment was at the end of May, over two months away. However, if I want to see her daughter, who is not a doctor but a nurse practitioner, I can get an appointment in April. That’s still a few weeks but it’s not a few months.

Let me remind everyone what happened last time I had to go to the doctor (and yes, I’m starting to think she’s avoiding me, foisting me off on her non-doctor daughter.)

Our system is not wonderful. Anyone who uses it knows that. My insurance company is now sending me quarterly marketing materials that look like warmed-over Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire magazine articles, reminding me to eat my vegetables and to exercise and get enough sleep. They even include recipes, as if the internet hasn’t been invented and I can’t find a damn recipe on my own.

This is what BlueCross BlueShield is spending its money on. But I don’t need that. I already know that stuff. I’d really prefer they stop with the patronizing PR/marketing bullshit. Let me be clear: the absolute last thing I want is a “relationship” with my insurance company. What I really want is for them to just basically do their jobs and otherwise leave me the fuck alone. That shouldn’t be too hard.

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Filed under healthcare

Obamacare Boosts Wages, Tennessee Proves

What’s that you say? It’s true, according to Dean Baker:

This is the “job loss” that has gotten opponents of the ACA so excited. But there is another aspect of this picture that should get other people excited. Back in intro economics we teach students about supply and demand. Other things equal, we expect a reduced supply – in this case of workers – to lead to a higher price or wage. In other words, a reduction in labor supply associated with the ACA might lead to some increase in wages.

We have an opportunity to test this proposition since Tennessee effectively did Obamacare in reverse, eliminating health insurance subsidies for low and moderate income adults without children in 2005. If the resulting change in labor supply has an impact on the market, then we would expect to see a drop in wages in Tennessee relative to other states.

That is in fact what we see. The figure below shows the median real wage for workers with high school degrees or less (the workers most likely to be affected) in Tennessee since 2000 compared to the workers without high school degrees elsewhere in the South.

btp-2014-02-20

Interesting idea. Also ironic that Tennessee kicked its low and moderate income folks in the teeth 9 years ago and saw a decline in wages as a result. It stands to reason that lifting up these folks will see a rise in wages. It’s sorta what people like Krugman have been saying since forever, but don’t expect the Republican’ts to start listening.

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Filed under healthcare, Obamacare, Tennessee, wages

Yet Another Anti-Obamacare Story Falls Apart

The Tennessean committed an act of journalism and actually looked into the claims of Emilie Lamb, a Tennessee woman who has become the “national posterchild” for the anti-Obamacare crowd, appearing in Americans For Prosperity ads and mentioned in an op-ed by that harpy Marsha Blackburn.

Like every other one of these stories, it doesn’t add up:

Her beef? The health coverage she had received for years — and liked — under a state program known as CoverTN ended last year because it was deemed substandard under the health care law. Now she pays seven times more for a plan she says is more than she needs.

Supporters of the law who have examined CoverTN say the coverage Lamb had under the state plan was the very kind of junk policy the health care law was meant to replace.

There were restrictions on the number of times she could see a doctor or specialist. Emergency room visits were limited. Financial help for prescriptions was capped. But the real danger of CoverTN, they said, was that it covered a maximum $25,000 in medical bills a year— an amount a moderate hospital stay could easily eat up.

Even BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, which administered the program for the state, warned consumers on its website that CoverTN benefits “are very limited compared to traditional insurance.”

[…]

Advocates for the health care law say Lamb was lucky to avoid financial ruin under her old plan, especially because of the long-term expenses associated with lupus.

And they said she could have opted for a much less expensive option that covers hospitalization — including a plan costing $159 per month — among the 37 plans offered on the federal HealthCare.gov health exchange serving Tennessee residents.

Basically, Lamb is an idiot. As I wrote last November,

If you liked insurance that is basically ripping you off then you’re a moron. You’re probably one of those people who thinks a Nigerian prince wants to send you a million bucks. Guess what, that’s a scam, too.

Okay, it’s not fair to say CoverTN was ripping people off but let’s remember who and what it was designed for: it was a program Gov. Bredesen created to cover all of those people who were uninsured because of pre-existing conditions and those who got kicked off TennCare, our state Medicaid program. It was,

[…] designed to offer stripped-down medical coverage to the uninsured at a steep discount.

Denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions is now against the law — remember, this is the part of the Affordable Care Act everybody likes — so you can see how an insurance program designed to cover a group of people who no longer exist might be a tad superfluous.

CoverTN was also created for the unemployed and self-employed — it was designed for portability. Again, this is a key part of the Affordable Care Act (and the part that the media completely missed when it erroneously reported the “Obamacare kills 2.5 million jobs” lie): with health insurance tied to your employment, people didn’t have the freedom to leave jobs, retire, stay home with the kids for a while, start a new enterprise, be self-employed, etc. etc. If you, your spouse or child had a health condition, you were trapped in your job by your need for health insurance. Under Obamacare this is no longer the case. As a self-employed person let me say: this is wonderful.

Also, CoverTN was created for low-income people who made too much money to be eligible for TennCare but not enough money to be able to afford traditional insurance. Emilie Lamb paid $52 a month, but that was just one-third of the actual premium’s cost: the rest was paid by employers ($50) and the state ($50). Seems like if Gov. Haslam would get off his ass and accept the federal help to expand Medicaid here, people like Lamb wouldn’t be complaining.

And finally,

The entire Cover Tennessee plan will “sunset” in 2010, at which time it will be re-evaluated by the legislature.

It was going to go away anyway.

CoverTN was created as a stop-gap measure for a marketplace which no longer exists. People are no longer denied insurance for pre-existing conditions. The unemployed and self-employed no longer have limited options for obtaining health insurance. Low-income people — at least, those in states which don’t have recalcitrant Republican governors who’d rather hurt the poor than defy the Tea Party — have expanded state Medicaid programs to turn to.

I just can’t take Emilie Lamb’s complaints seriously.

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Filed under health insurance, healthcare, Tennessee

Rand Paul Is Lying

Stop the presses: Rand Paul claims when his son signed up for Obamacare, he was “forced” onto the Kentucky Medicaid rolls:

The senator briefly flashed a blue-and-white insurance card before launching into a diatribe about his son’s travails: “We didn’t try to get him Medicaid…They automatically enrolled him in Medicaid,” Paul said. “For a month they wouldn’t talk to us because they said they weren’t sure he existed. He had to go down to the welfare office, prove his existence, then, next thing we know, we get a Medicaid card.”

Paul then extrapolated from his son’s experience to make a general point about Kentucky’s health exchange: “Most of the people in Kentucky are getting automatically enrolled in Medicaid.”

Paul is lying.

The Affordable Care Act allowed states to automatically add residents who already receive other social services, such as food stamps and other health programs, to the Medicaid rolls. But Kentucky chose not to take advantage of that provision of the law. The state is notifying some residents of their eligibility for Medicaid, but Paul’s son would have needed to actually apply for Medicaid in order to receive a Medicaid card.

Midkiff couldn’t discuss the Paul family’s specific troubles due to confidentiality laws. But her general description of the state’s exchange clearly contradicts Paul’s story. When a Kentuckian visits Kynect, the state’s health insurance website, she’s asked to provide basic information about herself—age, location, income, number of dependents, etc.—to determine whether she qualifies for the Medicaid expansion or other insurance subsidies. The website is designed to encourage people who are eligible for Medicaid to apply, but it doesn’t force anyone onto the Medicaid rolls. The applicant would still have to actively choose to enroll in a specific Medicaid plan.

Rand Paul is lying.

Of course, it wouldn’t be the first time.

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Filed under health insurance, healthcare, Rand Paul

Identity Theft Memory Hole

It’s very amusing that people have suddenly discovered the identity theft issue, but it’s really annoying that they only seem to care about it in relation to Healthcare.gov. It’s not like your private insurance company doesn’t have all of this same information, folks, and it’s not like they are any less vulnerable to theft than Obamacare.

Let’s take a trip into the memory hole and go waay back to 2009. Oh lookie here: BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee had 57 hard drives containing unencrypted client identity information stolen from a closet at its Chattanooga office.

Or how about back in 2007, when thieves stole laptops containing the Davidson County voter rolls — which include everyone’s social security numbers?

We’re always hearing about data breaches at places like Amazon.com and PayPal. I need look no further back than October 2013 when the State of Tennessee, which processes my paychecks, lost all of my information — not just social security number and passport number but also my freaking bank account number, because I signed up for direct deposit. All of it … gone. Not only did I not get paid for an entire month but now I have to worry about what the hell happened to this sensitive information. Probably nothing, but should I take this risk?

Wingers are going nuts about the Obamacare website exposing people to identity theft, but it’s not like everyone’s information isn’t available to thieves in a thousand other ways, too. Identity theft isn’t new, and it isn’t something Obamacare has brought on.

I find this incredibly annoying.

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Filed under Blue Cross, health insurance, healthcare, Obamacare