Oh, Snap

I know nobody says “Oh, snap” anymore but it seemed an appropriate retort to The Economist’s take on America’s latest mass shooting:

Those who live in America, or visit it, might do best to regard them the way one regards air pollution in China: an endemic local health hazard which, for deep-rooted cultural, social, economic and political reasons, the country is incapable of addressing. This may, however, be a bit unfair. China seems to be making progress on pollution.

Cold, but true. The rest of the world no longer feels sorry for us, and can you blame them?

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: unless and until there are economic repercussions for our gun lunacy, things are unlikely to change.

3 Comments

Filed under gun violence, Guns

3 responses to “Oh, Snap

  1. CB

    The gun lobby also needs to cease to exist. I couldn’t care less whether the rest of the world feels sorry for us or not. We’ve done this to ourselves, primarily by inaction in the face of stark, raving lunacy. Boys will be boys. You know the drill.

  2. thomasthe dooter

    What this European (Scot) finds so bewildering is that it is being seriously advocated that if those in the Prayer meeting were armed then the terrorist would have been shot and no-one else harmed. Now I’m an atheist but if your country has sunk to the point that those attending religious services should be armed for their own protection then there’s not much hope for you.

    • Agree.

      An NRA board member posted (then deleted) a comment on Facebook blaming Rev. Clementa Pinckney for the shooting because Pinckney, who died in the event, was also a state senator who voted against open carry legislation. That presupposes all sorts of facts not in evidence, including that there would open carry advocates in that Bible study who were denied the ability to carry on up to the reality that armed citizens rarely prevent mass shootings — in the few incidents where this has happened, the “armed citizen” was actually law enforcement or military.

      But in the land of fantastical thinking where RWNJs need to be the heroes of their own movies, of course everything magically turns out the way they imagine it will.